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Recording Criteria

What is an OSHA Recordable - Wade Associates.

In this module, we'll take a closer look at general and specific recording criteria. As we mentioned earlier, an injury or illness meets the general recording criteria, and is recordable, if it results in any one of the following six conditions:

  1. death
  2. days away from work
  3. restricted work or job transfer
  4. medical treatment beyond first aid
  5. loss of consciousness
  6. A significant injury or illness diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional.

1. Death

You must record an injury or illness that results in death by entering a check mark in column (G) of the OSHA 300 Log for cases resulting in death. You must also report any work-related fatality to OSHA within 8 hours.

1. Which of the following is required for an injury to be classified as a recordable case?

a. It must require a diagnosis by a licensed health care professional
b. It must require treatment beyond first aid
c. Within must be reported within 24 hours
d. It must result in serious pain

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2. Days Away From Work

Record the day after the injury.
Start recording days away from work the day after the injury.

When an injury or illness involves one or more days away from work, place a checkmark in column (H) of the OSHA 300 Log and an enter the number of calendar days away from work in column (K).

  • If the employee is out for an extended period of time, enter an estimate of the days the employee will be away and update the day count when the actual number of days is known.
  • Start counting days away on the day after the injury occurred or the illness began.
  • End the count of days away from work on the date the physician or other licensed health care professional recommends that the employee return to work. This applies regardless of whether the employee returns earlier or later than recommended. If there is no recommendation from the physician or licensed health care professional, enter the actual number of days the employee is off work.
  • Count the number of calendar days the employee was unable to work as a result of the injury or illness, regardless of whether the employee was scheduled to work on those day(s). Include weekend days, holidays, vacation days or other days off in the total number of days recorded if the employee would not have been able to work on those days because of a work-related injury or illness.
  • Stop tracking the number of calendar days away from work once the total reaches 180 days away from work and/or days of job transfer or restriction. Entering 180 in the total days away column is adequate.
  • If the employee leaves your company for a reason unrelated to the injury or illness such as; retirement, a plant closing, or to take another job you may stop counting days away from work or days of restriction/job transfer. If the employee leaves your company because of the injury or illness, you must estimate the total number of days away or days of restriction/job transfer and enter the day count in column (L).
  • Enter the number of calendar days away for the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log that you prepare for the year in which the incident occurred. If the days away extend into a new year, estimate the number of days for that year and add that amount to the days from the year of occurrence. Do not split the days between years and enter amounts on the logs for two different years. Use this number to calculate the total for the annual summary and then update the initial log entry later when the day count is known or reaches the 180-day cap.

2. You may stop tracking the number of days away from work on the OSHA 300 Log _____.

a. the employee is on restricted duty after returning to work
b. when the total number of business days away is 100
c. after the employee has been away more than 30 days
d. once the total reaches 180 calendar days

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3. Restricted Work or Job Transfer

Restricted duty.
If the employee can't perform all routine functions, it's restricted duty.

When an injury or illness involves restricted work or job transfer but does not involve death or days away from work, you must record the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log by placing a check mark in column (I) and enter the number of restricted or transferred days in column (L).

Restricted work occurs when, as the result of a work-related injury or illness:

  1. you keep the employee from performing one or more of the routine functions of their job, or from working the full day that they would otherwise work; or
  2. a physician or other licensed health care professional (HCP) recommends that the employee not perform one or more of the routine functions of their job, or not work the full workday that they would otherwise work.

For recordkeeping purposes, an employee's routine functions are those work activities the employee regularly performs at least once per week.

A recommended work restriction is recordable only if it affects one or more of the employee's routine job functions. To determine whether this is the case, you must evaluate the restriction in light of the routine functions of the injured or ill employee's job.

A partial day of work is recorded as a day of job transfer or restriction for recordkeeping purposes, except for the day on which the injury occurred or the illness began.

Record job transfer and restricted work cases in the same column (I).

Count days of job transfer or restriction in the same way you count days away from work. The only difference is that, if you permanently assign the injured or ill employee to a job modified or permanently changed to eliminate the routine functions the employee was restricted from performing, you may stop the day count when the modification or change is permanent. You must count at least 1-day of restricted work or job transfer for such cases.

3. For OSHA recordkeeping purposes, each of the following is considered restricted work EXCEPT when _____.

a. you keep employees from performing routine functions
b. non-routine functions are only performed once a month
c. you keep employee from working the full day
d. health care professionals recommend restrictions

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4. Medical Treatment Beyond First Aid

Record cases involving treatment beyond first aid.
Record cases that require treatment beyond first aid.

Medical treatment means any treatment not contained in the list of first aid treatments. Examples of first aid include: the use of non-prescription medications at non-prescription strength, the application of hot or cold therapy, eye patches or finger guards, and others. For OSHA 300 recordkeeping purposes, medical treatment does not include:

  1. visits to a physician or other licensed health care professional solely for observation or counseling;
  2. the conduct of diagnostic procedures, such as x-rays and blood tests, including the administration of prescription medications solely for diagnostic purposes (e.g., eye drops to dilate pupils); or
  3. first aid, which includes only those treatments specifically listed in 1904.7. Examples of first aid include: the use of non-prescription medications at non-prescription strength, the application of hot or cold therapy, eye patches or finger guards, and others.

5. Loss of Consciousness

You must record a work-related injury or illness if the worker becomes unconscious, regardless of the length of time they remain unconscious.

4. Where would you look to determine if a treatment is considered first-aid?

a. In the OSHA 300 Log instructions
b. In OSHA 1904.7, General Recording Criteria
c. In the company's recordkeeping guidelines
d. In the CDC first-aid handbook

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Significant injuries and illnesses.
Injuries and illnesses can be significant even if medical treatment is not recommended.

6. Significant Injuries or Illnesses

You must record a case if it involves a significant injury or illness diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional (HCP), even if it does not result in any of the other five conditions we have been discussing.

There are some significant progressive diseases, such as byssinosis, silicosis, and some types of cancer, for which medical treatment or work restrictions may not be recommended at the time of diagnosis but are likely to be recommended as the disease progresses.

Cancer, chronic irreversible diseases, fractured or cracked bones, and punctured eardrums are generally considered significant injuries and illnesses, and must be recorded under the general criteria at the initial diagnosis even if medical treatment or work restrictions are not recommended, or are postponed, in a particular case.

5. For OSHA recordkeeping purposes, each of the following should be recorded under the general criteria once diagnosed EXCEPT _____.

a. punctured eardrums
b. cancer
c. chronic irreversible diseases
d. sinusitis

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Needlestick and Sharps Injury Recording Criteria

Needlesticks are recordable.
Needlesticks are recordable.

You must record all work-related needlestick injuries and cuts from sharp objects that are contaminated with another person's blood or other potentially infectious material (OPIM) (as defined by 29 CFR 1910.1030). Enter the case on the OSHA 300 Log as an injury (Column (M)(1)).

To protect the employee's privacy, you may not enter the employee's name on the OSHA 300 Log (see the requirements for privacy cases in paragraphs 1904.29(b)(6) through 1904.29(b)(9))

The term "other potentially infectious materials" is defined as:

  • human bodily fluids, tissues and organs; and
  • other materials infected with the HIV or hepatitis B (HBV) virus such as laboratory cultures or tissues from experimental animals.

Do I have to record all cuts, lacerations, punctures, and scratches?

  • No, you need to record cuts, lacerations, punctures, and scratches only if they are work-related and involve contamination with another person's blood or other potentially infectious material. If the injury is later diagnosed as an infectious bloodborne disease, you must also update the description to identify the infectious disease and change the classification of the case from an injury to an illness.

What about splashes or exposure to OPIM without being cut or scratched?

You need to record such an incident on the OSHA 300 Log as an illness if:

  • It results in the diagnosis of a bloodborne illness, such as HIV, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C; or
  • It meets one or more of the recording criteria in 1904.7.

NOTE: If you have a sharps exposure incident that is not a needle stick, you must still record it if it results in death, days away from work, restricted work or transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond first aid, loss of consciousness, or diagnosis of a significant injury or illness, such as HIV, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C.

6. Record cuts, lacerations, punctures, or scratches on the OSHA 300 Log as an injury if _____.

a. they are work-related and involve contamination with another person's blood or OPIM
b. whether or not they are work-related or involve your own blood or OPIM
c. only if they involve contamination with blood or OPIM from any source
d. if the injury results in first aid treatment

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Medical Removal Recording Criteria

Record a medical removal on the OSHA 300 Log.
Record a medical removal case as involving days away from work or restricted work activity.

If another OSHA standard requires the medical removal of an employee, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log.

  • You must enter each medical removal case on the OSHA 300 Log as either a case involving days away from work (Column H) or restricted work activity (Column I), depending on how you decide to comply with the medical removal requirement.
  • If the medical removal is the result of a chemical exposure, you must enter the case on the OSHA 300 Log by checking th injury as a poisoning (Column (M)(4)).
  • If the case involves voluntary medical removal before reaching the medical removal levels required by an OSHA standard, do not record the case on the OSHA 300 Log.

7. You must enter each medical removal case on the OSHA 300 Log as a case involving _____.

a. both days away from work and restricted work activity
b. only days away from work
c. only restricted work activity
d. days away from work or restricted work activity

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Occupational Hearing Loss Recording Criteria

Record a medical removal on the OSHA 300 Log.
You may have to record a hearing loss with a Standard Threshold Shift (STS).

If an employee's hearing test (audiogram) reveals that the employee has experienced a work-related Standard Threshold Shift (STS) in hearing in one or both ears, and the employee's total hearing level is 25 decibels (dB) or more above audiometric zero (averaged at 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz) in the same ear(s) as the STS, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log.

What is a Standard Threshold Shift?

A Standard Threshold Shift, or STS, is defined in the occupational noise exposure standard at 29 CFR 1910.95(g)(10)(i) as a change in hearing threshold, relative to the baseline audiogram for that employee, of an average of 10 decibels (dB) or more at 2000, 3000, and 4000 hertz (Hz) in one or both ears.

Do I have to record the hearing loss if I am going to retest the employee's hearing?

  • No, if you retest the employee's hearing within 30 days of the first test, and the retest does not confirm the recordable STS.
  • Yes, if the retest confirms the recordable STS. Record the hearing loss case within 7 calendar days of the retest.
  • Update, if subsequent audiometric testing performed under the testing requirements of the noise standard (See 1910.95) indicates that an STS is not persistent. Update by erasing, deleting, or lining-out the recorded entry.

When do I record a hearing loss case on the OSHA 300 Log?

  • Yes. When a hearing loss is work-related or has been significantly aggravated according to 1904.5, enter it in the column for hearing loss ((M)(5)).
  • No. When a physician or other licensed health care professional determines that the hearing loss is not work-related or has not been significantly aggravated by occupational noise exposure, the case is not work-related.

8. If an employee has a recordable Standard Threshold Shift, you are required to enter the hearing loss on the OSHA 300 Log unless a retest that fails to confirm the recordable STS is conducted within _____.

a. 24 hours
b. 7 days
c. 30 days
d. 45 days

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Tuberculosis Reporting Criteria

Record a medical removal on the OSHA 300 Log.
Record TB as a respiratory disease.

If any of your employees has an occupational exposure to anyone with a known case of active tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive skin test or diagnosis by a physician or other licensed health care professional, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log by checking the "respiratory condition" column ((M)(3)).

Do not record a pre-employment positive skin test because the exposure was not in your workplace. Line out or erase a recorded case if you prove that:

  • the worker lives in a household with a person diagnosed with active TB;
  • the Public Health Department identifies the worker as a contact of an individual with a case of active TB unrelated to the workplace; or
  • a medical investigation shows that the employee's infection was caused by exposure to TB away from work, or proves that the case was not related to the workplace TB exposure.

9. A recordable case of tuberculosis (TB) is recorded on the OSHA 300 Log as _____.

a. skin condition
b. respiratory condition
c. other recordable case
d. all other illnesses

Check your Work

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Video

Check out this video!

This is a fast-paced video by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry presenting general requirements and examples of how to fill out the forms.

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